News

Heat wave to last through Thursday

National Weather Service issues a heat advisory, temperatures could top 90 degrees

Hot weather is expected to linger in the Bay Area through Thursday, May 28. Stock image courtesy Pexels.com.

A heat wave is expected to linger in the Bay Area through Thursday night, with the possibility of record-setting temperatures, forecasters said.

The heat is expected to peak on Tuesday and Wednesday throughout the region and areas of the Central Coast, according to the National Weather Service.

A heat advisory has been issued for interior areas, which will see temperatures ranging from the 90s to 104 on the hottest days. Shoreline areas and the Santa Cruz County coast could warm to the upper 80s and lower 90s, forecasters said.

Downtown San Francisco can expect temperatures in the lower 80s while oceanfront areas will peak in the mid-70s. Other coastal areas should remain relatively mild, in the 70s to about 80 degrees, compared to inland areas.

Overnight lows will range from the upper 50s to mid 60s, which may limit the amount of typical overnight relief from the heat, the weather service said. Temperatures will start to cool slightly Thursday.

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Spare the Air alerts issued

Soaring temperatures and more cars on the roads brought haze back to Bay Area skies this week, prompting air district officials to forecast unhealthy air for the second day in a row.

The district's Spare the Air Alert for Monday was the first of 2020 and Tuesday's air quality isn't going to be any better, according to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Light winds combined with triple-digit inland temperatures along with vehicle exhaust are expected to produce smog, or ozone, accumulation.

"As temperatures and traffic increase in the Bay Area, unfortunately, so does unhealthy air quality," said Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the air district. "When it matters most, we can protect our respiratory health and reduce our exposure to smog by avoiding outdoor activities during the hottest part of the day."

Smog can cause throat irritation, congestion, chest pain, trigger asthma, inflame the lining of the lungs and worsen bronchitis and emphysema. Long-term exposure to ozone can reduce lung function. Ozone pollution is particularly harmful for young children, seniors and those with respiratory and heart conditions.

When a Spare the Air Alert is issued, outdoor exercise should be done only in the early morning hours when ozone concentrations are lower.

People can find out when a Spare the Air alert is in effect by visiting sparetheair.org, calling 800-HELP-AIR (4357-247), downloading the Spare the Air smartphone app for iPhone or Android devices or connecting with Spare the Air on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.

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Heat wave to last through Thursday

National Weather Service issues a heat advisory, temperatures could top 90 degrees

by /

Uploaded: Mon, May 25, 2020, 1:46 pm
Updated: Tue, May 26, 2020, 11:55 am

A heat wave is expected to linger in the Bay Area through Thursday night, with the possibility of record-setting temperatures, forecasters said.

The heat is expected to peak on Tuesday and Wednesday throughout the region and areas of the Central Coast, according to the National Weather Service.

A heat advisory has been issued for interior areas, which will see temperatures ranging from the 90s to 104 on the hottest days. Shoreline areas and the Santa Cruz County coast could warm to the upper 80s and lower 90s, forecasters said.

Downtown San Francisco can expect temperatures in the lower 80s while oceanfront areas will peak in the mid-70s. Other coastal areas should remain relatively mild, in the 70s to about 80 degrees, compared to inland areas.

Overnight lows will range from the upper 50s to mid 60s, which may limit the amount of typical overnight relief from the heat, the weather service said. Temperatures will start to cool slightly Thursday.

Spare the Air alerts issued

Soaring temperatures and more cars on the roads brought haze back to Bay Area skies this week, prompting air district officials to forecast unhealthy air for the second day in a row.

The district's Spare the Air Alert for Monday was the first of 2020 and Tuesday's air quality isn't going to be any better, according to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Light winds combined with triple-digit inland temperatures along with vehicle exhaust are expected to produce smog, or ozone, accumulation.

"As temperatures and traffic increase in the Bay Area, unfortunately, so does unhealthy air quality," said Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the air district. "When it matters most, we can protect our respiratory health and reduce our exposure to smog by avoiding outdoor activities during the hottest part of the day."

Smog can cause throat irritation, congestion, chest pain, trigger asthma, inflame the lining of the lungs and worsen bronchitis and emphysema. Long-term exposure to ozone can reduce lung function. Ozone pollution is particularly harmful for young children, seniors and those with respiratory and heart conditions.

When a Spare the Air Alert is issued, outdoor exercise should be done only in the early morning hours when ozone concentrations are lower.

People can find out when a Spare the Air alert is in effect by visiting sparetheair.org, calling 800-HELP-AIR (4357-247), downloading the Spare the Air smartphone app for iPhone or Android devices or connecting with Spare the Air on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube.

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