News

Bullis board skeptical of San Antonio school plans

Unanswered questions leave charter school leaders uneasy about the future

Bullis Charter School board members weighed in with a hearty dose of skepticism Monday night on whether the Los Altos School District's plan to buy land for a new campus in Mountain View is the right path forward.

The charter school's Oct. 1 board meeting marked the first official opportunity for the Bullis board of directors to ask questions and give input on the school district's plans for a 10th school site. Bullis resides within the Los Altos district and relies on it for its facilities.

What school is housed at the relatively small new campus could have huge ramifications for Bullis' future -- particularly if the charter school grows from 900 to 1,200 students.

Despite the high stakes, communication between district officials and the charter school has been fairly limited. And Los Altos School District and Bullis board members have both said that they don't have enough information from the other side to make an informed decision on the 10th site.

Los Altos school board president Vladimir Ivanovic, joined by board member Bryan Johnson, laid out the unusually complex strategy envisioned by the district: Los Altos School District would use eminent domain to buy about 9.6 acres of land at the corner of Showers Drive and California Street and replace the existing businesses with a new school, selling the "unused" density allowed on the property to developers to defray the costs. The Mountain View City Council has agreed to pitch in $23 million in city park fees to further offset the costs -- in return for public access to playing field space -- and the San Antonio area of the city would finally have a school campus to call its own.

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As district officials rapidly approach closing on the land deal, Johnson told the board of directors that now is the time for the Bullis community to lay out the charter school's enrollment growth plans and to gauge whether charter school families would be willing to relocate to the San Antonio campus.

None of those questions were definitively answered Monday night, with a majority of the charter school board members instead questioning whether a land purchase was really the right choice. Some board members also raised concerns that moving the charter school to the northernmost tip of the district would cause more problems than it would solve, potentially adding traffic congestion, safety problems and packing a high number of kids on a fairly small site.

"BCS is already well over 900 students now, so looking at a 9-acre site has me very concerned," said Bullis board member Andrea Eyring, a Mountain View resident.

Perhaps the greatest subject of scrutiny was the district's rationale that buying land is necessary to deal with projected enrollment growth in the Mountain View portion of the district, where thousands of apartments in the San Antonio neighborhood are either under construction or in the pipeline. Los Altos School District's enrollment has declined by close to 300 students since 2014 -- and dropped again this year, though it's unclear by how much -- and the relatively small, high-cost apartments being built in Mountain View may not generate a huge number of new students, said Ann Waterman Roy, a Bullis board member and longtime school administrator.

She said taxpayers should feel confident that district officials didn't rush ahead on a land purchase, and vetted the idea of building and using facilities at existing school sites before spending all of the $150 million in Measure N bond money on a new school.

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Bullis board member Clara Roa, one of the few trustees who directly tackled the question of whether she supports moving Bullis to Mountain View, said she felt she couldn't make a decision with so much uncertainty. The transaction between the district, the property owner and the city of Mountain View isn't a done deal and, if it does go through, she said the district still has to contend with an environmental review that could unearth all sorts of problems. Even if everything works out, how many kids could even fit on the site?

"It is a very difficult question to answer with so little information," she said.

Roa also asked how, if Bullis moves to the Mountain View site, the district would house the large number of new students projected to live north of El Camino Real in the coming years. The neighborhood is currently split between Covington, Almond and Santa Rita elementary schools, and all three campuses are close to capacity.

"That's something we would have to work out together," Johnson said.

Parents and residents who spoke at the meeting had mixed perspectives, but generally encouraged board members from both the district and the charter school to work together. Covington Parent Jing Wu said she doesn't see how Bullis Charter School's goal of growing to 1,200 students was going to work in the context of a Mountain View school, given the sheer amount of traffic that would be forced into the San Antonio area. But the alternative -- siting the charter school in the small family town of Los Altos with its single-lane streets -- would be even less tenable, she said.

Former Los Altos school board member Tamara Logan said she was surprised to see so much skepticism, if not opposition, to a facilities plan that could finally solve long-standing disputes between the school district and the charter school dating back more than a decade. She said the plan to acquire land, buy park space and fix overcrowding has been the consistent message since she was on the board pushing for Measure N in 2014.

"I'm amazed that there's been so much effort in the community trying to stop a possible solution," she said.

Los Altos Hills Mayor John Radford said there's been an expectation from the start that Measure N was supposed to solve the division and create some type of permanent facilities solution for the charter school, which has been housed in portables at Egan and Blach junior high schools. Instead, four years have gone by with "absolutely no progress," he said, and both parties need to take responsibility for the sluggishness.

Radford said he worried that both sides are moving away from a consensus on how to spend the money, rather than coming together, which doesn't bode well for future planning.

"You're hardening your sides," he said. "More and more you're going apart, not together."

The latest estimates from district officials is that the 10th school site could potentially open in 2022. A child in preschool when Measure N passed would be too old to attend the new elementary school by the time it opens.

Trenna Sutcliffe, Bullis board member and Los Altos resident, said the school district should make absolutely clear to the San Antonio community how the future school site will be used, and that putting Bullis at the 10th site could be perceived as a betrayal.

"I'm actually very concerned that the community north of El Camino may be misled and may be very upset, and rightly so, if they expected a neighborhood school after this site is purchased," Sutcliffe said. "Because if BCS is housed on this site, that's not a neighborhood school. I have a big concern about misleading the community."

After the meeting, Johnson told the Voice that the district appreciates the chance to address the Bullis board, and that it should be a first step in a more collaborative relationship. Bullis board members have been invited to the next school district board meeting, scheduled for Oct. 8, which is the first opportunity the district will have to make concrete decisions on the use of the Mountain View school site.

Though the Bullis board did not take action or give an official direction on the charter school's preferred use of the 10th site, Johnson said the meeting showed signs of progress.

"The meeting last night was a good first step," he said. "As simple as it was, it's something that hadn't happened in recent years."

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Bullis board skeptical of San Antonio school plans

Unanswered questions leave charter school leaders uneasy about the future

by / Mountain View Voice

Uploaded: Thu, Oct 4, 2018, 12:25 pm

Bullis Charter School board members weighed in with a hearty dose of skepticism Monday night on whether the Los Altos School District's plan to buy land for a new campus in Mountain View is the right path forward.

The charter school's Oct. 1 board meeting marked the first official opportunity for the Bullis board of directors to ask questions and give input on the school district's plans for a 10th school site. Bullis resides within the Los Altos district and relies on it for its facilities.

What school is housed at the relatively small new campus could have huge ramifications for Bullis' future -- particularly if the charter school grows from 900 to 1,200 students.

Despite the high stakes, communication between district officials and the charter school has been fairly limited. And Los Altos School District and Bullis board members have both said that they don't have enough information from the other side to make an informed decision on the 10th site.

Los Altos school board president Vladimir Ivanovic, joined by board member Bryan Johnson, laid out the unusually complex strategy envisioned by the district: Los Altos School District would use eminent domain to buy about 9.6 acres of land at the corner of Showers Drive and California Street and replace the existing businesses with a new school, selling the "unused" density allowed on the property to developers to defray the costs. The Mountain View City Council has agreed to pitch in $23 million in city park fees to further offset the costs -- in return for public access to playing field space -- and the San Antonio area of the city would finally have a school campus to call its own.

As district officials rapidly approach closing on the land deal, Johnson told the board of directors that now is the time for the Bullis community to lay out the charter school's enrollment growth plans and to gauge whether charter school families would be willing to relocate to the San Antonio campus.

None of those questions were definitively answered Monday night, with a majority of the charter school board members instead questioning whether a land purchase was really the right choice. Some board members also raised concerns that moving the charter school to the northernmost tip of the district would cause more problems than it would solve, potentially adding traffic congestion, safety problems and packing a high number of kids on a fairly small site.

"BCS is already well over 900 students now, so looking at a 9-acre site has me very concerned," said Bullis board member Andrea Eyring, a Mountain View resident.

Perhaps the greatest subject of scrutiny was the district's rationale that buying land is necessary to deal with projected enrollment growth in the Mountain View portion of the district, where thousands of apartments in the San Antonio neighborhood are either under construction or in the pipeline. Los Altos School District's enrollment has declined by close to 300 students since 2014 -- and dropped again this year, though it's unclear by how much -- and the relatively small, high-cost apartments being built in Mountain View may not generate a huge number of new students, said Ann Waterman Roy, a Bullis board member and longtime school administrator.

She said taxpayers should feel confident that district officials didn't rush ahead on a land purchase, and vetted the idea of building and using facilities at existing school sites before spending all of the $150 million in Measure N bond money on a new school.

Bullis board member Clara Roa, one of the few trustees who directly tackled the question of whether she supports moving Bullis to Mountain View, said she felt she couldn't make a decision with so much uncertainty. The transaction between the district, the property owner and the city of Mountain View isn't a done deal and, if it does go through, she said the district still has to contend with an environmental review that could unearth all sorts of problems. Even if everything works out, how many kids could even fit on the site?

"It is a very difficult question to answer with so little information," she said.

Roa also asked how, if Bullis moves to the Mountain View site, the district would house the large number of new students projected to live north of El Camino Real in the coming years. The neighborhood is currently split between Covington, Almond and Santa Rita elementary schools, and all three campuses are close to capacity.

"That's something we would have to work out together," Johnson said.

Parents and residents who spoke at the meeting had mixed perspectives, but generally encouraged board members from both the district and the charter school to work together. Covington Parent Jing Wu said she doesn't see how Bullis Charter School's goal of growing to 1,200 students was going to work in the context of a Mountain View school, given the sheer amount of traffic that would be forced into the San Antonio area. But the alternative -- siting the charter school in the small family town of Los Altos with its single-lane streets -- would be even less tenable, she said.

Former Los Altos school board member Tamara Logan said she was surprised to see so much skepticism, if not opposition, to a facilities plan that could finally solve long-standing disputes between the school district and the charter school dating back more than a decade. She said the plan to acquire land, buy park space and fix overcrowding has been the consistent message since she was on the board pushing for Measure N in 2014.

"I'm amazed that there's been so much effort in the community trying to stop a possible solution," she said.

Los Altos Hills Mayor John Radford said there's been an expectation from the start that Measure N was supposed to solve the division and create some type of permanent facilities solution for the charter school, which has been housed in portables at Egan and Blach junior high schools. Instead, four years have gone by with "absolutely no progress," he said, and both parties need to take responsibility for the sluggishness.

Radford said he worried that both sides are moving away from a consensus on how to spend the money, rather than coming together, which doesn't bode well for future planning.

"You're hardening your sides," he said. "More and more you're going apart, not together."

The latest estimates from district officials is that the 10th school site could potentially open in 2022. A child in preschool when Measure N passed would be too old to attend the new elementary school by the time it opens.

Trenna Sutcliffe, Bullis board member and Los Altos resident, said the school district should make absolutely clear to the San Antonio community how the future school site will be used, and that putting Bullis at the 10th site could be perceived as a betrayal.

"I'm actually very concerned that the community north of El Camino may be misled and may be very upset, and rightly so, if they expected a neighborhood school after this site is purchased," Sutcliffe said. "Because if BCS is housed on this site, that's not a neighborhood school. I have a big concern about misleading the community."

After the meeting, Johnson told the Voice that the district appreciates the chance to address the Bullis board, and that it should be a first step in a more collaborative relationship. Bullis board members have been invited to the next school district board meeting, scheduled for Oct. 8, which is the first opportunity the district will have to make concrete decisions on the use of the Mountain View school site.

Though the Bullis board did not take action or give an official direction on the charter school's preferred use of the 10th site, Johnson said the meeting showed signs of progress.

"The meeting last night was a good first step," he said. "As simple as it was, it's something that hadn't happened in recent years."

Comments

Everybody Knows Now
Martens-Carmelita
on Oct 4, 2018 at 12:54 pm
Everybody Knows Now, Martens-Carmelita
on Oct 4, 2018 at 12:54 pm

The Mountain View City Council can no longer pretend that the plan of the Los Altos School District for the new school site is uncertain. The district's plan is to unload BCS at the site. It is not for a neighborhood school in Mountain View.


This is SO stupid
Monta Loma
on Oct 4, 2018 at 1:20 pm
This is SO stupid, Monta Loma
on Oct 4, 2018 at 1:20 pm

Who actually wants a school here? Anyone?? Not the school that's supposed to go there, not the neighbors who will live nearby.

The only ones who do are LASD Board members who will live far away and have no further concern for the traffic and the loss of a neighborhood school that could have been built in the NEC and will become more difficult if not impossible is BCS is there.

Why is MV enabling this mess? Why were they so concerned for the Slater neighborhood's rights to have a school of their own but so indifferent about the NEC situation?

This is a totally ridiculous waste of time and money and pretending to all get along and dance around each other is a farce.


Los Altos go home
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Oct 4, 2018 at 1:25 pm
Los Altos go home, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Oct 4, 2018 at 1:25 pm

The can't do anything town can go not do it in their own town.


William Hitchens
Registered user
Waverly Park
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:30 pm
William Hitchens, Waverly Park
Registered user
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:30 pm

Bullis has every right to be skeptical. The plan is dodgy at best, it's a horrible location, and there's far too little land to allow for the school, parking, and adequate playgrounds and recreational space. Also, isn't LASD planning to use eminent domain to acquire that commercially zoned parcel? That could cause some "interesting" legal problems, to say the least.


Pot
Registered user
another community
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:34 pm
Pot, another community
Registered user
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:34 pm

MVCC voted to place a pot dispensary at the San Antonio Center. Next to this potential school site. LASD, this scheme to place BCS or any school at this site is a BAD idea. You can use our tax dollars to build fences and hire security but it is time you realize this is not going to work. Please use the 110 acres you have and show us the actual numbers to build a school on a current site instead of throwing random numbers in the air.


William Hitchens
Registered user
Waverly Park
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:38 pm
William Hitchens, Waverly Park
Registered user
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:38 pm

@Pot: Well spoken. Dispensaries don't belong within walking distance of any school. They should be out of the way and hard to get to.


MVFlyer
Monta Loma
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:44 pm
MVFlyer, Monta Loma
on Oct 4, 2018 at 2:44 pm

LASD considers Bullis a thorn in its side (and perhaps they are, but that's not the point). LASD would love to unload Bullis onto Mtn View, and keep the Los Altos schools and land for Los Altos kids. And there is no guarantee that MV kids will qualify to go to Bullis (or even want to). So why are we in MV allowing this????

And MV has offered $23M in parks funds? Did I read that right? $23M for what exactly?????


Vote YING LIU
Registered user
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Oct 4, 2018 at 8:58 pm
Vote YING LIU, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
Registered user
on Oct 4, 2018 at 8:58 pm

Remember - if you want reason to prevail vote for Ying Liu and only Ying so you don’t delete her votes. The LASD BOT needs BCS representation- BCS parents are, after all, LASD taxpayers and should have a voice in the LASD shenanigans. Ivanovic and Johnson will just continue with the current tactic of “screw BCS at any cost and both the taxpayers and the LASD kids lose. VOTE Iconovic and Johnson OUT. They care about their own agenda, not the kids.


Vote YING LIU
Registered user
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Oct 5, 2018 at 9:03 am
Vote YING LIU, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
Registered user
on Oct 5, 2018 at 9:03 am

@Pot - they don’t need to build another school. If they move 6th grade to middle school, give Covington to BCS and redistribute the Covington kids to their other neighborhood schools (Covington was built as a middle school) all schools remain small and the $150M bond money can be used to improve ALL schools. That solves the problems without squandering the taxpayers money.


@Ying
another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 10:31 am
@Ying, another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 10:31 am

Ok, you can stop being political and lining for Ying.

We. Don’t. Want. Middle. Schools. 7-8 is what makes Los Altos special. You (Bullis) have K-8. Awesome! You enjoy that and let us enjoy 7-8. Thanks.


Santa Rita Parent
another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 11:30 am
Santa Rita Parent, another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 11:30 am

If one were to actually survey LASD parents on the question of moving to the Middle School model, my guess is that at least 75% would be in favor of such a move.

Of course, LASD will never undertake any such survey because they need 6th grade to be in the elementary schools in order to bolster their "all of our schools are full" argument.


LASD Reality
another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 2:44 pm
LASD Reality, another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 2:44 pm

Springer's not full. They only have 2 K classes this year, and a very small (14) TK. They've bumped kids in K over to Almond and maybe Loyola to bolster those schools. If the current K size holds each year going forward, in 6 years Springer will be down to 46 times 7 or 322 students. This is a school that has reached 600 in the past.

Enrollment is declining.

Oh another thing. The charter school board says Springer is one of the 2 lowest interest schools for enrolling in the charter. So there's that too.

It doesn't really mater if Springer drops to 322 or 275. Both are way small. Maybe it will be a bit larger. Maybe it will be 300 without 6th and 350 with 6th. Still not much difference.

Adding or taking away 6th grade doesn't really make that much difference in the enrollments.


LASD Reality
another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 2:51 pm
LASD Reality, another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 2:51 pm

Look at the 2 schools that serve the growing areas North of El Camino in Mountain View. That would be Santa Rita and Almond. Covington only serves the Crossings and Old Mill Condos which are built to capacity with no new housing possible. So the LASD hope lies in the growth coming allegedly at Santa Rita and Almond.

Both are DOWN this year. Almond is 488 (once was 575) and Santa Rita is 524. Both down from last year. Both were once much larger, Santa Rita reached 580 at a point.

Not only that, but the charter school took no new students at grades 1-6 this year, as they had reached their agreed limit in those grades (105 students each, same this year and last year). So we're seeing a decline even in the so called hotbeds of unrestrained growth caused by those bogeymen on the MV City Council.

TAKE NOTE!


LASD Reality
another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 2:57 pm
LASD Reality, another community
on Oct 5, 2018 at 2:57 pm

Here's a bright idea. Move 7th grade to elementary school. Have Egan by an all-8 campus, and use Blach to house the charter school. It's sized for 711 in permanent buildings and has 300 space in portables for the charter school already. So that makes over 1000 without adding any portables, and there's room to put more there. Plus, 711 is grades 7 to 8. You can probably use the existing Blach buildings for more than 711 grades K-8. I bet it has equivalent space for 1200 students K8 easily, with no new construction.

Need to bulk up those elementary schools. They are just too small to operate.


Dhruva Herle
Registered user
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Oct 6, 2018 at 4:27 pm
Dhruva Herle, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
Registered user
on Oct 6, 2018 at 4:27 pm

JUST GODDAMN MAKE YOUR MINDS UP! This argument has been going nowhere for the past few years. We are sick & tired of just not getting answers. BCS or Neighbourhood K-8 school. Neighbourhood school, duh! That was the original plan and will be paid for w/ our tax dollars. Better be something of use for us. Then we'd be wasting the little money we have on the rich who have plenty! NOT THE WAY TO GO! Also, LASD hasn't done anything about measure N (for a new BCS site). IT'S PURELY THEIR FAULT AND WE SHOULDN'T HAVE TO SUFFER!!! This is not fair as they're not letting our voices being heard and it's a bunch of board members who just don't goddamn care about us suffering cause it has no impact on them. I am truly pissed of about this and they should let the public speak up. These are our future generations and THEY MATTER MOST. Speak up, this is our future and the only opportunity to make a school for us! WHY USE OUR TAX DOLLARS, MV's PARK FUNDS, AND OUR LAND ON THE RICH!? This in itself is discrimination as most of the people living in my area being Latinos who would be forced to use what they have on rich caucasian kids who have richer families due to the wage gap. NO! Tell your local governments about this and SPEAK UP! IT MATTERS!


Doug Pearson
Registered user
another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 2:32 pm
Doug Pearson, another community
Registered user
on Oct 7, 2018 at 2:32 pm

Some of the comments touch on the points I have no knowledge of: What is the current enrollment in each existing school, and what grades does it teach. What is the total district enrollment and how is it expected to change in the next few years?

Is Bullis really at 900 enrollment already? What grades does it teach? Does the expected increase in enrollment come from students who would otherwise attend other LASD schools? From the expected increase in total LASD enrollment? From adding grades, eg, 7 and 8?

In other words, is Bullis enrollment going up while other LASD school enrollments are going sideways or down?


Getting On With it
another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 3:24 pm
Getting On With it, another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 3:24 pm

Well, keep in mind that this new school won't open until 2022. So what's the rush to decide how to assign its use? Well, Bullis is indeed at 908 students this year and has slots for 1060 next year. The enrollment for 2018-2019 finalizes this week with the 1060 slots being assigned Saturday in a random lottery. Usually there are 1000 students on the wait list. Almost all students are LASD residents but others can get in if there is an open slot at the lottery. Usually the openings for non-LASD are in grades 7 and 8. This year the charter added slots from a new class in each grade K-6.

The reason there was little growth this year was that the 5 year constraints placed in a deal with LASD expire after the current year, so no growth was left for this year. The idea appears to be to make up for that by 2 years worth of growth next year. This year just 1 8th grade class was added.

Still, this no growth year in grades K-6 is that it is interesting to see LASD drop by 160 students with only 20 of the drop coming from grades 7 and 8. With Bullis frozen, grades K-6 dropped 140. There is every reason to believe that if Bullis were frozen next year (t's not) the drop would be about the same AGAIN in LASD. But if Bullis grows 160 in grades K-6, the total added drop next year should be 300 in LASD.

LASD has dropped for several years now. Last year it had 4403 in the Fall. This year it's 4243., Bullis 908. Next year that's projected to be 3940 LASD, 1060 Bullis.

The good news is that the Bulls board is interested in remaining right where they are at Egan going forward. They aren't asking for any new buildings, etc. That's a myth. At the same time, Egan enrollment is starting to drop too. Egan is about 100 more students than Blach though Blach is built for more than Egan. So one way the district could deal with the Bulls growth is to switch more Egan students to Blach and grow Bullis at Egan.


Getting On
another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 3:26 pm
Getting On, another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 3:26 pm

About 75% of the Egan students arrive each day by car. Many are in the Blach attendance area which means all of those Blach-livers are in cars driving to Egan. So, switching them to Blach where they are assigned would help reduce car trips.


Getting On
another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 3:36 pm
Getting On, another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 3:36 pm

By 2021, the enrollment is likely to be 1200 at Bullis and 3600 at the 9 traditional LASD schools. The Junior High will be about 450 students on average and the elementary schools will be 380 or so. At that point, Bulls will be 1200 students, or about 3 times the size of the average traditional LASD school. So the push to squeeze 900 new spaces out on new land is pretty rich. Instead, it will be easy to leave Bullis where they are on Junior High sites, but expand the one at Blach to match the size of the one at Egan. Problem solved.

Nothing says that new classrooms permanent built are needed by the charter, and certainly not that 100% should be permanent. But LASD has this 5 year old plan that sought to quarantined Bullis on new land, at the expense of the local kids in the San Antonio area. Those kids fill out 3 of the LASD schools to keep the average school size for K-6 up at 380 students. Otherwise, it would be much lower.


@ getting on (first post)
another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 4:32 pm
@ getting on (first post), another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 4:32 pm

Where do you find the data about 75% of Egan kids arrive by car?? Have you seen the bike traffic in the morning, and the full multiple bike cages? My kids walk so they don’t even account for that. Egan consists of kids from Santa Rita (all in those boundaries can and usually bike or walk), Almond (most bike) and Covington (I personally know many who bike and others who drive). I’m curious where you get this 75% are driven as I would guess 25% drive. No one in 7-8th grade wants mommy driving them to school, trust me!


Egan Parent
another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 10:03 pm
Egan Parent, another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 10:03 pm

I agree that LASD should do more to balance attendance between Egan and Blach. The notion that LAHS bound students have to attend Egan and MVHS bound students have to attend Blach is nonsense.


WoW numbers
another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 10:52 pm
WoW numbers, another community
on Oct 7, 2018 at 10:52 pm

There's a lot of misimpression out there about the LASD schools being largely served by Walk Or (bicycle) Wheels methods of student transport. The last studies that LASD has been relying on are 5 years old from Greentown Los Altos in 2013. Since then the population of Egan has grown and a lot of the has been the students from the other side of El Camino Real. Consider that there are more students in both 7th and 8th grade than in any other grade found at the elementary schools. This was not always true. A reasonable estimate is that 200 of the NEC kids must commute to Egan from the other side of El Camino Real, and the vast majority of them are driven to school, whether they like Mommy doing it or not. Maybe Daddy does it. Some do carpool. Anyway, I think it's reasonable to conclude that more are coming via private auto than did back in 2013. Egan serves kids from every elementary school in LASD aside from Oak Avenue. This fact has been attested to in court filings regarding to equivalent facilities for BCS, where the applicable area is the Junior High area for Egan and the elementary schools that feed it. Also, keep in mind that besides Mommy and Daddy, some of these kids are probably driven by paid staff, nannies, au pair, what have you. Of course Egan serves the entire Gardner Bullis attendance area which is a long ways away. It also serves parts of Loyola and Springer, also far away. Older siblings attending Los Altos High School are legally permitted to drive their younger brothers and sisters to Egan.

Anyway, back in 2013, the Greentown numbers have 81% of Covington students being driven to that school, 75% of Loyola kids coming in cars, 64% of Springer, 69% of Oak, 69% of Almond, 73% of Santa Rita and 88% of Gardner Bullis, NONE of the LASD elementary schools is a majority WoW school. For Blach, the Car numbers are 52% by Car as of 2013, and for Egan it was surveyed at 60% by car in 2013. I believe the district has purposely allowed more kids assigned to Blach to elect to go to Egan instead since 2013, about 50 more such kids. I think they ALL come via car. So this coupled with the NEC increases says to me that 75% of Egan kids come by car. Basically LASD gave up on the surveys after the WoW numbers declined compared to 2012 in the 2013 figures. We don't know, but perhaps WoW for Blach is up but not likely from the reputation of that drop off area. The neighbors swear it has gotten worse.

At Egan it's certainly not 25%. It has not gone DOWN since 2013. Just look at the drop off area any day. You'll see the chaos of all those kids arriving in cars with coffee drinking harried parents and others at the wheel.


@wow
another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 8:49 am
@wow, another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 8:49 am

I think you’re confusing many of those cars with Bullis Charter. That seems to be 90% drop off, absolutely. I’ll give you that!


One more for @WoW
another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 8:52 am
One more for @WoW, another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 8:52 am

I find it really hard to believe that there are a lot of students coming to Egan from Oak, Springer, and Loyola. I do not know a single one. Why would they choose to commute to Egan? That literally makes no sense.
Additionally, the district just announced their numbers at each site and Egan only serves about 30 more students than Blach. This makes sense as Santa Rita and Almond are bigger than Oak and Loyola.
To me, your posts are pure speculation. The numbers add up and math doesn’t lie.


Vote YING LIU
Registered user
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Oct 8, 2018 at 1:00 pm
Vote YING LIU, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
Registered user
on Oct 8, 2018 at 1:00 pm

@ @Ying

“Ok, you can stop being political and lining for Ying.”
I’m not being political- I don’t have kids in school, have no affiliation with BCS and don’t know Ying. I’m just a taxpayer that’s sick of watching the LASD BoT squander my tax dollars on ridiculous plans and feuds with BCS. Therefore Ivanovic and Johnson need to go. Ying Liu is not invested in the feud- she will help to move things forward in a more reasonable way.

“We. Don’t. Want. Middle. Schools. 7-8 is what makes Los Altos special.”
You should really do some research on the 6-8 model. It’s a better academic program with no negative social ramifications. LASD 7-8 is not special, it’s backward. And it’s a waste of money when creating a 6-8 school could eliminate the need for buying land and constructing an entire school. As a said before, I’m a taxpayer...


No on Ying
another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 1:26 pm
No on Ying , another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 1:26 pm

Ok, well our votes will cancel each other’s out :). Ying is a mole for Bullis and only cares for BCS, not your tax dollars.


Drop Off
another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 2:09 pm
Drop Off, another community
on Oct 8, 2018 at 2:09 pm

Most students who had attended Loyola and Springer attend Blach in Junior High. But there are a number of those who SHOULD attend Blach who instead transfer to Egan. As such they live farthest from Egan and they come in cars. It's not that complicated.

Also, a number of those assigned to Covington in elementary school are in this category too. They should be attending Blach but they opt for Egan instead. Covington didn't exist when the MVLA attendance boundaries were defined, and it straddles them.

As for the fact that most LASD schools have 75% arriving in cars, and Bullis may have slightly more, well, so what? It's not a very big difference at all.


Vote YING LIU
Registered user
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Oct 8, 2018 at 2:33 pm
Vote YING LIU, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
Registered user
on Oct 8, 2018 at 2:33 pm

@no on Ying - it sounds like you also are invested in the decade-old feud with BCS. So sad that your group can’t accept that a fair (and growing) number of parents like the school and that it’s here to stay. Accept it, move on and stop squandering our tax dollars on things that don’t benefit any of the kids.


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