What I Saw on Mulberry Street – and other cultural revisions | An Alternative View | Diana Diamond | Mountain View Online |

Local Blogs

An Alternative View

By Diana Diamond

E-mail Diana Diamond

About this blog: So much is right — and wrong — about what is happening in Palo Alto. In this blog I want to discuss all that with you. I know many residents care about this town, and I want to explore our collective interests to help ...  (More)

View all posts from Diana Diamond

What I Saw on Mulberry Street – and other cultural revisions

Uploaded: Mar 9, 2021
Writing about racism in our society today is always a delicate – and sometimes a dicey -- matter. Some people, it seems, are rushing to declare a book as “racist” or “anti-racist” after reading a few opening paragraphs.

I am anti-racism -- I’ve been so for years and years. I am also a Democrat. And white. And the ban of six Dr. Seuss books has, unfortunately, become politicized.

I support Dr. Seuss. After re-reading a couple of his now unacceptable and never-to-be-published-again books, I think the censoring of those six books is written in the 1950s too drastic an action. The decision was made by the Dr. Seuss Enterprises. The business said it “came after working with a panel of experts, including educators, and reviewing its catalog of titles.” Except this group of “experts” remain unnamed. some of Seuss’s books are now being taken off library shelves by librarians saying the books are “racist.”

I first discovered Dr. Seuss when my four children were toddlers. M weekly trip to the library for books to read always included Seuss books. They all loved them. Favorites were “The Cat and the Hat “and “Green Eggs and Ham.”

Dr. Seuss (born Theodor Seuss Geisel), was creative, a wonderful rhymer, whimsical, repetitive (for those learning to read), and simply giggly fun. He drew fantastic cartoon characters.

So, the other day I reread some of the banned books, starting with “And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street.” In brief, the story line is about a young boy, Marco, whose father tells him to look at what he saw when walking down to his school o Mulberry Street, and report back to him. The first day he saw nothing, and his father told him to try harder. The second day he saw an old man sit ting on a cart being pulled by a horse. His father liked it and told Marco to find something new. Alas, on the third day all he saw was the same horse and old man.

Soon the boy realized he couldn’t tell his father about the same old man each day, so he began making up a creative tale. “I’ll have a zebra pulling the cart,” he declared, which soon became a blue elephant. The cart got bigger and when a reindeer was pulling, the card became a sled. Soon became a float with a bandstand and 18 musicians. Still not satisfied, he had two giraffes helping the blue elephant. And then there was a parade, led by four policemen on motorcycles – all on Mulberry Street.

Toward the end of the book on a double-page spread, he created people watching the parade, including the mayor and city council, some young kids, a grandstand and Sgt. Mulvaney leading the parade on his police motorcycle. Among the hundreds gathered, in the left-hand corner on a double-page spread. Seuss included Chinese man eating a bowl of rice with his chopsticks. The man had a long braid, a pointed hat and two lines for his eyes. That one little man on the corner of the page has caused all the fuss and the declarations the book was “racist.”

Now some say Seuss is using the drawing as a symbolic figure for all Chinese, and that is the book should not be published. I feel like this group of “experts” was using a magnifying glass to go through each page to find something offensive. So, I took a magnifying glass and thought maybe the policemen were symbols of Irishmen in a racist way, and the band, well it had no female members – so is that sexist? How far can we take this – looking for something culturally inappropriate to ban a book? Mulberry Street is a stylized cartoon book full of creative fun characters. Period.

The same is true in Seuss’s “If I Ran a Zoo” book. It starts with a boy walking through a zoo, looking at tigers and lions and rhinoceroses in cages, and declared that if he ran this zoo, he would have creatures from everywhere. And so, he describes Australian, Asian and American animals he would create, and then takes some from the African island of Yerka. And therein lies the problem. Two monkey-looking animals are dressed in grass skirts and are barefoot and Seuss now gets accused of depicting black Africans as monkeys.

So why does this manner? Because it is one more incident in claiming something is offensive. Yet all of Seuss’s characters are weird and have strange names.

And where do we draw the line?

Maybe we should start banning all the John Wayne cowboy-and Indian movies, because white Wayne always wins? Should these movies be banned because they are anti-American Indians? And what about Charlie Chan movies? Time to ban them?

And not too long ago, a San Francisco school district had a committee that recommended 26 names of schools should be removed because these individuals did something inappropriate in their lives. George Washington owned slaves, so his name must go, as well as Abraham Lincoln, Dianne Feinstein, Francis Scott Key, etc.

We’ve gone too far. We are applying some of today’s values on people who were our heroes. It’s called Culture Cancel. It feels like we want to erase what offends us from past. The problem is what’s offensive to some may not be to others. Abraham Lincoln? He freed the slaves, yet his name must go, the committee declared.

We learn from the past, and change our views. We don’t get rid of the past.




We need your support now more than ever. Can we count on you?

Comments

 +   31 people like this
Posted by Jennifer, a resident of another community,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 3:11 pm

Jennifer is a registered user.

Well... I'm used to this "woke" nonsense, but it is asinine. And you wonder why so many people have a scornful disdain for progressives. They're not dealing with reality. There is nothing offensive about the Dr. Seuss books.


 +   36 people like this
Posted by Chantrelle, a resident of East Palo Alto,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 3:36 pm

Chantrelle is a registered user.

White people simply dont' get it.

If a team monicker is deemed offensive to certain ethnicities (i.e. the former Washington Redskins or Chief Wahoo of the Cleveland Indians) it must GO!

Animal names are exempt unless they complain about their portrayel. Dr. Doolittle could investigate further if necessary.

Team names depicting extinct civilizations are OK...like the Spartans, Trojans, Aztecs etc.

On the other hand, some ignorant white people embrace team monickers that are seemingly disparaging towards themselves.

Case in point...The Fighting Irish of Notre Dame which depicts a little drunk leprechaun with his dukes up which is acceptable if whites want to look stupid.

It is not the same for people of color.

As for Dr. Suess, his wartime cartoons of Japanese-Americans were both tasteless and misguided.

If white folks want to caricaturize themselves like Notre Dame, that is their choice but stereotypical and demeaning mascots of minority people is another story.

And if a white person cannot comprehend this slight they are either racist, ignorant or blind.

As for Lincoln and Washington, the truth is finally being exposed as Lincoln cared more about preserving the United States for white political interests than the welfare of slaves.

He even suggested to Frederick Douglass that freed slaves would be better served if they were all transported to Central America following the Civil War.

And Washington was just another wealthy white slave owner who like Jefferson, fathered a few mulattos of his own.

So why should we be putting them up on a pedestal?


 +   2 people like this
Posted by R. Cavendish, a resident of another community,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 3:52 pm

R. Cavendish is a registered user.

"Animal names are exempt unless they complain about their portrayel."

Concurring...unlike the Stanford Indian mascot that some of the older members of the university alumni association fought so hard to maintain, we never had that kind of an issue at Westwood.

Go Bruins!


 +   2 people like this
Posted by Hans Schmidt, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 4:09 pm

Hans Schmidt is a registered user.

On the CNN Lincoln documentary it was noted that he wrote the Emancipation Proclamation to prevent England from entering the war and aiding the Confederacy. The subsequent freedom of the slaves was just a by-product of a contrived manipulation.

Lincoln was just another smooth-talking politician, like Clinton.

>portion deleted


 +   21 people like this
Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 4:16 pm

Bystander is a registered user.

I am completely against tribalism and cancel culture. The ultimate reason is that eventually where will we draw the line?

Disney calls the female characters in some of the fairy tales princesses! They are not princesses, except perhaps Sleeping Beauty and Snow White. Isn't that then wrong to real princesses? Oh and Pocahontas was a princess, and treated like one when she went to the Court in England. So Pocahontas is a historical figure and the rest are imaginary? So should Disney be cancelled for putting real princesses into the same group as imaginary princesses as well as imaginary characters who were not princesses? See how complicated it gets.

What about Italians who are often portrayed as overweight with big piles of spaghetti, or the French who are often portrayed with striped shirts, berets, strings of onions riding bicycles, or Scotsman wearing kilts and playing bagpipes, or Australians looking like Crocodile Dundee (remember him?) chasing kangaroos?

St. Patrick's Day later this week, should anyone who can't claim to be born in Ireland or at least have a parent or grandparent who was born in Ireland, be allowed to celebrate St. Patrick's Day and wear green?

Easter is the day of celebration for the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Does that mean that only Christians can have egg hunts and display bunnies?

Are we going to force everyone to stay in their own little tribe and never come out? Is it going to be forbidden to learn that Abraham Lincoln did a lot of good, that Sir Francis Drake was a great explorer as was Christopher Columbus, that David Starr Jordan was a great biologist who did a lot of research into the lives of dolphins? Are we going to say that the only people who are worth learning from are those who are perfect, not only in the time in which they lived, but the present, and going forward for all times in the future.

Tribalism has to stop. Cancel Culture has to stop. Instead we must learn that all individuals have "warts and all"!


 +   24 people like this
Posted by Jennifer, a resident of another community,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 4:18 pm

Jennifer is a registered user.

So showing a Chinese man eating with chopsticks ("If I Ran the Zoo") is racist? Some people will find anything to complain about. How about increasing your self esteem and not get so offended over the littlest things.

Chinese people eating with chopsticks is cultural, not racist. A lot of us DO understand the difference.


 +   16 people like this
Posted by I miss my small town feel, a resident of another community,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 5:28 pm

I miss my small town feel is a registered user.

VERY simple answer to this:

"And Washington was just another wealthy white slave owner who like Jefferson, fathered a few mulattos of his own. So why should we be putting them up on a pedestal?"

DESPITE all their imperfections, they founded or contributed greatly to a country with a system of rules and laws that is far better today then when they fought to make changes.

In 200 years YOU might be looked down upon for killing animals for food or killing fetuses for convenience as society might say we have plenty of resources to allow those to live.


 +   18 people like this
Posted by Squidsie, a resident of another community,
on Mar 9, 2021 at 9:42 pm

Squidsie is a registered user.

Censoring Dr.Suess? Here is a bit of advice to the perpetually indignant lefties: If your policies cannot be readily distinguished from a Saturday Night Live skit or other satire, perhaps they are a little bit "over the top" and should be reconsidered.


 +   14 people like this
Posted by Robert J., a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 7:56 am

Robert J. is a registered user.

*unlike the Stanford Indian mascot that some of the older members of the university alumni association fought so hard to maintain, we never had that kind of an issue at Westwood.

The old white guys wearing cardinal red caps with the white S during football games at the original Stanford stadium are probably the ones you are speaking of.

Most of them have passed on while embracing the original mascot.

*Easter is the day of celebration for the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Does that mean that only Christians can have egg hunts and display bunnies?

FYI..the Easter Bunny is not a Christian symbol and neither is Santa Claus at Christmas. They were invented by white folks to commercialize the holidays.

*Sir Francis Drake was a great explorer

FYI.. Drake was a pirate knighted by the Queen for plundering other ships on the high seas and sharing the booty with the crown.

He stopped in NorCal for supplies (i.e. lumber to repair his ship).

*David Starr Jordan was a great biologist who did a lot of research into the lives of dolphins?

FYI..Jordan spent the majority of his time studying the fake 'science' of eugenics and white superiority than he did researching dolphins, thus his scholarly name was removed from both Stanford and *gasp* even by the PAUSD.

*Chinese people eating with chopsticks is cultural, not racist.

FYI..So are white hillbillies shooting and dining on roadkill.

Since American history was concocted by white people, it is understandable that it will have elements of racial undertones or rather racist overtones.

And some white people cannot handle being held accountable for the past oversights and perspectives of their racist ancestry.


 +   15 people like this
Posted by jessica landers, a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 8:42 am

jessica landers is a registered user.

Everyone is potentially racist, even people of color so nothing is going to change regardless of removing book illustrations and offensive names.

White people should also complain of black people referring to them as honkeys.

When the name-calling stops from both sides, then we'll discuss matters further.

Until then, anything and everything goes.


 +   16 people like this
Posted by Dad of 2, a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 8:54 am

Dad of 2 is a registered user.

Wow. Diana: Those aren't monkeys...they are racists depictions of Africans. And yes, depicting an Asian in stereotypical styles using language like "eyes at a slant" is racist also. This is pretty basic stuff, people.


 +   20 people like this
Posted by staying home, a resident of Crescent Park,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 9:18 am

staying home is a registered user.

I think the real story should be praise of Dr. Seuss Enterprises for reviewing their catalog, seeing problematic images, and making the decision to stop publishing the books in question. Racism has permeated our society in so many ways, it appropriate to look back and acknowledge it, and choose to move forward without it.


 +   24 people like this
Posted by Bland, a resident of Old Palo Alto,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 9:23 am

Bland is a registered user.

I don't want to offend anyone, so I will ignore reading any books of the past since they all contain something that is undoubtedly offensive.

"Have a Good Day" (I hope that doesn't offend anyone who might not want to have a good day).


 +   9 people like this
Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 9:43 am

Bystander is a registered user.

Bland, you hit the nail on the head.

Tribalism is alive and well on Palo Alto Online!


 +   4 people like this
Posted by Robert M., a resident of another community,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 9:52 am

Robert M. is a registered user.

In retrospect...

During the late 1950s, I attended the old Mayfield School on El Camino Real.

One day, an African American schoolmate and I were dragged into the principal's office following a verbal altercation with a white classmate who was using the N & J words towards us.

The teacher [portion removed] reprimanded us and when asked to explain the reason for our verbal retorts responded, "What's wrong with that?" (in other words being called an N-word or the J-word).

Time periods have nothing to do with disparaging depictions and being called offensive names as it is nothing more than a lame excuse for WHITE racism whether suble or blatant.

[Portion removed.]


 +   17 people like this
Posted by Jay, a resident of another community,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 10:11 am

Jay is a registered user.

Good to see that racism couched in unrighteous indignation vis-à-vis "things were better in back in my day when people weren't so sensitive" continues to thrive in the Bay Area</sarcasm>.

We should always continue to look back upon our past and revisit ideas, media, and everything else through a modern eye, so we can learn not to perpetuate antiquated, and sometimes hateful views.

I find it funny that those who say people shouldn't be so sensitive don't seem to realize their own sensitivity in relation to preventing further perpetuation of racist ideas. What are you scared of? Maybe you should reflect on why you feel the need to dismiss others so you can feel okay about keeping old habits and ideas.


 +   21 people like this
Posted by Alan, a resident of Menlo Park: Belle Haven,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 10:29 am

Alan is a registered user.

With the advent of political correctness - are people genuinely kinder and more respectful to one another than in the past? That's what matters, and I'm not sure that they are. It seems like people are more hostile than ever - at least on social media. If this isn't progress, then the appropriate thing is to re-think how we genuinely improve race relations. Courtesy matters; but being hyper-sensitive is not a successful strategy for dealing with differences. Take care to treat others kindly, but be slow to offense.


 +   10 people like this
Posted by Jay, a resident of another community,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 10:48 am

Jay is a registered user.

@Alan, why should those who've been continuously offended and discriminated against, such as POCs, be slow to offense? Why should they be polite? Why should they be patient? Why should they be calm? when often times they have not been afforded the same courtesy by the offender. They often need to raise their voices in order to be heard as evidenced by BLM protests.


 +   23 people like this
Posted by Joseph E. Davis, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 12:27 pm

Joseph E. Davis is a registered user.

Those who want to ban books are always in the wrong.


 +   16 people like this
Posted by CalAveLocal, a resident of Evergreen Park,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 1:00 pm

CalAveLocal is a registered user.

I am a huge fan of Dr. Seusse, and was really happy to read them to my little one. However, one of the six books that are going out of print is a book that gave me a big pause and I chose to shelf it and not read it, because it rubbed me the wrong way, and I did not want to explain to my child why we no longer find imagery in it acceptable - not at that age.
Having said that, enough with the fake outrage. No-one is banning the books. They are still in the library where they can be freely checked out, they are not being burned in large fires like the masks in Idaho.
A private foundation that owns the copyrights to these books made a decision to discontinue printing 6 out of 60+ books written by Dr. Seusse. This is capitalism at its finest - freedom to make decisions regarding their business.
They decided that these 6 particular books did not age well, and are not going to bring them financial benefits the way others will. Stop making it anything other than that!
Back in the day when we had Odwalla Juice, they made a decision to discontinue their "Viva Las Veggies" juice mix. It was a spicy tomato/veggie mix that I thought was the best thing ever. Some people found it less so and it was't bringing the sales Odwalla wanted. They discontinued it. I was sad to see it go. But then I still had the tangerine juice to look forward to.
There are dozens of his other books that are lovely. "Fox in Socks", "Oh the places you'll go", "Lorax" after all.
Are we so accustomed to the drama of the last 4 years that we try to get the adrenalin fix where no drama exists?


 +   10 people like this
Posted by side splitting, a resident of Midtown,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 1:12 pm

side splitting is a registered user.

Wonderful post, hats off to you!
Could not have said it better.


 +   8 people like this
Posted by Alan, a resident of Menlo Park: Belle Haven,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 1:32 pm

Alan is a registered user.

@Jay - There's a time for authors and publishers to self-censor, out of respect. I think the "If I Ran the Zoo" picture is offensive; I tend to think the changes already made to the "Mulberry Street" to make the Chinese drawing more respectable fixed it, but people have different opinions. It's a judgment call.

Still, the ability of a person to shrug off a slight, or look beyond a slight - racial or otherwise - will take them far in life. Waterproofing helps in the rain. I'm saying - don't let stereotypes define you, wherever they may exist. It's fine to expect basic respect; it is unhelpful to be overly sensitive. There's a fine line. Too much sensitivity does not result in more respect; it leads to defensiveness. Too much sensitivity results in being owned by the stereotypes, rather than overcoming the stereotypes.


 +   8 people like this
Posted by Piers in Amsterdam, a resident of another community,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 2:41 pm

Piers in Amsterdam is a registered user.

Fortunately you do not live in Europe where various offensive depictions can turn deadly.

Is anyone in Palo Alto even vaguely familiar with the 2015 Charlie Hebdo incident in Paris where Muslim jihadists went in and killed 12 people and wounded 11 others just because they were offended by a satirical cartoon depicting the prophet Mohammed?

Most likely not as Prop 13 debates and arguing over entrance requirements at Foothills Park seem to remain the key concerns and priorities of many small-minded Palo Alto residents.

But there is a bigger world beyond your nutshell visions.

Continually offending minority people with a sense of cavalier indifference could lead to tragic repercussions and from what I have witnessed, America is at war within its own boundaries.

Thus it should not surprise anyone if the racial tensions in America get even worse. The Capitol insurrection spoke volumes and the Helter Skelter prophesies of a deranged individual appear to be festering in the United States.

Dr. Suess and George Floyd are just the tip of the iceberg.


 +   10 people like this
Posted by Barron Parker Too, a resident of Barron Park,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 4:28 pm

Barron Parker Too is a registered user.

Very fine column, Diana. Thank you for bringing this issue up.

I understand that there are a lot of people who want to maintain their status as victims of the terrible racist white oppressive society, designed and perpetuated by those horrible people that won our freedom from Great Britain and designed the first government "of the people, by the people and for the people", with a completely novel constitution that limits government's powers via the first 10 amendments. I must admit being a little surprised that these people also consider themselves victims of Abraham Lincoln, president #16 from 160 years ago, who kept the slave-holding South from becoming a separate slave-holding country, and instead declared all slaves free in the midst of the most dangerous and destructive war on North American soil. And who went on to win the war and liberate every slave. But if you're going to be a victim, you might was well go all-out!

As for the Seuss Enterprises, I see them as some of the greatest marketers in history. By publicly banning a mere 6 books (which will likely be available in Chinese editions RSN), they have unleashed a demand for the other 54+ books that liberated every existing copy from booksellers, and will ensure sales of millions more every year, as long as people read books. Well done, Seuss Enterprises.


 +   8 people like this
Posted by Mike Montoya, a resident of Adobe-Meadow,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 4:28 pm

Mike Montoya is a registered user.

Does this mean that caricatures with exaggerated features (regardless of ethnicity) are now taboo?

And what about political cartoons?

The Charlie Hebdo incident in Paris does not alarm me from the standpoint that something along those lines would never occur in America.

Disgruntled Asian-Americans, African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans do not follow the same path as Islamic terrorists who view martyrdom and mass killings as a form of religious redemption.

All things considered, white supremacists (e.g. Timothy McVeigh, the Ruby Ridge insurrectionists, the KKK and those involved in the Capitol riots) pose a far greater danger to American society.

Homeland Security is keeping a watchful eye on Muslim-inspired terrorism especially after 9/11 and the Boston Marathon + it is more difficult to enter the country nowadays from certain countries...which is good.

Homogenous countries (i.e. Scandinavian, Switzerland etc.) tend to have less racial conflicts than those open to immigration (i.e. the U.S., United Kingdom, France, and Germany).

Perhaps the key is to keep the easily offended OUT.


 +   15 people like this
Posted by ariel gonzalez, a resident of another community,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 4:50 pm

ariel gonzalez is a registered user.

>> Chinese people eating with chopsticks is cultural, not racist. A lot of us DO understand the difference.

I certainly understand the difference.

We are Mexicans and eat beans with rice 3-4 times a week.

And while we do not use chopsticks or wear those cute pointed straw hats, if one of us were depicted in a sombrero and eating a tamale, no one would raise a fuss.

Some folks are way over-sensitive. The Frito Bandito and Taco Bell Chihuahua commercials never bothered me so seeing a picture of a little Chinese man scurrying down the street with a bowl of rice seems borderline trivial.

And the same goes for Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben.

When they started calling Top Ramen 'Asian-style noodles' replacing 'Oriental-style noodles', the whole PC thing started getting out of hand.

Now please excuse me while I go 'make a run for the border'.


 +   13 people like this
Posted by Joseph E. Davis, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 5:53 pm

Joseph E. Davis is a registered user.

CalAveLocal: "No-one is banning the books. They are still in the library where they can be freely checked out, they are not being burned in large fires like the masks in Idaho."

This is dangerously minimizing the situation. Ebay, by far the largest marketplace for used books, banned them. Some copies are available on Amazon, but for more than $150 a copy. If you don't have much money and you want to read these books, that's much harder now than it used to be.

Even some libraries are removing them:
Web Link

I do find it outrageous, and there's nothing fake about that.


 +   25 people like this
Posted by Petra Karenter, a resident of Professorville,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 6:56 pm

Petra Karenter is a registered user.

Why is there so much MORAL PANIC these days?

In one week, we've moved from canceling Dr Seuss to canceling people for reading books.

I'm referring to Winston Marshall, banjoist for the band Mumford & Sons. Marshall is stepping away from his band in the wake of the heavy criticism he received for saying he thought Andy Ngo's new book about Antifa was thought-provoking. The Twitter mob got him.

Lesson to be learned: Be careful folks in letting people know what you read.

BANNING BOOKS IS WRONG.


 +   7 people like this
Posted by Duveneck neighbor, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Mar 10, 2021 at 11:27 pm

Duveneck neighbor is a registered user.

The books aren't being banned. The copyright owner will no longer publish them. Once the copyright runs out, all bets are off (but, that might take a few decades; thank you, Walt Disney...)

If a library removes them, protest to the librarian/CC/school board.

This is not 'cancel culture'. The mere use of the term betrays profound misunderstanding. White, Black, and Hispanic people don't get to say whether depictions of Asians are offensive or not.

Ms Diamond commits a logical fallacy, in presenting her bona fides (white, Democrat, etc) as if the presentation somehow immunizes her/her conclusion about Cancel Culture against charges of racism. Namely, the attempt is a non sequitur: No one is saying Ms Diamond is racist; no one is saying the Seuss estate is racist. But keeping these books -- indeed, keeping any historical depiction which through modern eyes perpetuates systemic discrimination of every sort -- without modern context or interpretation of what society has learned through pain and struggle over the preceding decades, centuries -- keeping them for what seems purely to be out of a 'space' of the privilege of nostalgia -- misses the point. Worse, it evidences how little we have actually grown as a society, since Ted Geisel first set ink and watercolor to paper (and set black greasepaint to his face -- which he did, to his later, deep regret).

Honestly, folks, if you haven't watched or read James Baldwin's "I Am Not Your Negro", then I recommend you do; it's available in libraries, and streaming on at least one mainstream service. Baldwin's point is over 50 years old, yet it remains in full force: unless and until those 'defending' mainstream culture, open their eyes and ears, and see and listen, and ultimately understand.... this nation will never achieve the aspirations set forth in the Preamble to the Constitution.

Systemic racism will not end through the protests of those harmed. It will only end when we all end it. All.


 +   14 people like this
Posted by Petra Karenter, a resident of Professorville,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 7:02 am

Petra Karenter is a registered user.

@Duveneck neighbor: Interesting post!

“Systemic racism" is one of terms casually tossed about by those reading from the Critical Race Theory playbook. Where is it? The 1964 Civil Rights Act outlaws prejudicial laws and policies.

If you want to change things in the system, go after the people who are running the entertainment and media industries, education, unions, much of current government, etc.

Be well!


 +   5 people like this
Posted by Lameesha, a resident of East Palo Alto,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 7:30 am

Lameesha is a registered user.

• Ms Diamond commits a logical fallacy, in presenting her bona fides (white, Democrat, etc) as if the presentation somehow immunizes her/her conclusion about Cancel Culture against charges of racism.

° So true as a myriad of white people don't seem to comprehend the issue.

You see...these controversial depictions of minorities are drawn by WHITE people, not people of color.

Now whether they are insensitive, ignorant, racist (or all of the above) is on them, not the people they are depicting.

Fortunately we live in a country where things can be discussed openly and without subsequent violence by the offended...unlike the Charlie Hebdo incident in Paris.

Imagine if Dr. Suess had drawn comical pics of the prophet Mohammed?


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Joseph E. Davis, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 8:34 am

Joseph E. Davis is a registered user.

> White, Black, and Hispanic people don't get to say whether depictions of Asians are offensive or not.

This is a racist belief.


 +   13 people like this
Posted by Angry But Proud African American, a resident of East Palo Alto,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 10:06 am

Angry But Proud African American is a registered user.

Joseph E. Davis is a registered user.
> White, Black, and Hispanic people don't get to say whether depictions of Asians are offensive or not.

This is a racist belief.

^ Spoken like a true or closet racist.

My mother used to tell me that "sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt".

I can abide by that adage BUT if/when things go beyond name-calling and turn physical, then it is time to retaliate physically no holds barred.

It is somewhat ironic that certain ethnic groups who are very sensitive about disparaging depictions and distasteful commentaries about their people are very insensitive towards thevtasteless depictions of other races.

All in the name of humor?

This has been going on in Hollywood for decades.


 +   13 people like this
Posted by Jim Neal, a resident of Old Mountain View,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 3:51 pm

Jim Neal is a registered user.

I find being referred to as a POC offensive. I am not a 'person of color'; I am a PERSON, period! People who refer to non-whites as 'people of color' are racists in my opinion, because that is all they seem to see. They seem to be incapable of treating and accepting everyone equally and to be obsessed with separating people by race, ethnicity, politics, and anything else they can come up with. If we are going to ban Dr. Seuss for not abiding by todays far left woke standards, then we might as well get rid of everything that wasn't built or written yesterday. I am just waiting for someone to insist that art in the museums be destroyed because it was created/painted by people who owned slaves or didn't speak out about slavery enough. How about tearing down the pyramids which were all built by slaves? Should we destroy the sarcophagi of the the Egyptian kings and queens because they owned slaves? The point is that the woke crowd will never be satisfied. It does not matter how many books or words are banned, they will ALWAYS need to find something else to separate us. From what I have seen, being woke is just another way to sow fear, hatred, and scorn, but feel good about yourself while doing it.

Jim Neal
(Formerly Old Mountain View)


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Joseph E. Davis, a resident of Woodside: Emerald Hills,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 5:51 pm

Joseph E. Davis is a registered user.

> Spoken like a true or closet racist

Angry But Proud African American, I would like to see you explain why.


 +   16 people like this
Posted by Petra Karenter, a resident of Professorville,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 7:07 pm

Petra Karenter is a registered user.

Historically, it's not the good guys who are out burning books and censoring speech. It isn't the caring, empathetic people who try to destroy lives based on something someone said years ago, often while young, often taken out of context. It isn't the good guys who take undisguised glee at the ruining of lives, families and careers.

You know who does these things? Awful people who seek some sort of vindication for their deficient characters by taking power trips while imposing suffering on others.

Web Link


 +   2 people like this
Posted by Alvin, a resident of Professorville,
on Mar 11, 2021 at 10:57 pm

Alvin is a registered user.

The only solution is secession. We had a pretty good run for almost 250 years, but it's well past time for a break-up. There are too many divisions, no common culture, and the country is too big to govern. Plus, we already destroyed the country and especially the younger generations with lockdowns, masks, and school closures over a fake disease -- where the all-cause mortality for 2020 is within range of previous years adjusting for population growth. My solution: the southern states, Midwest and Great Plains should break off into a separate nation; the west coast and Mountain states another, and the Northeast a third. One conservative, the other two liberal.


 +   7 people like this
Posted by Alvin, a resident of Professorville,
on Mar 12, 2021 at 7:06 am

Alvin is a registered user.

How ironic and hypocritical that the people who most favor canceling former slave owners, racist, xenophobes - and those who supported them - are the very same people who most vocally defend the greatest human rights abuses in most of our lifetimes - the lockdowns, forced mask wearing, school closures, social distancing, and, coming soon, vaccine passports.

Anybody who sheepishly wears a mask everywhere would have gone along with slavery and not spoken out or lifted a finger to free a slave before abolition.

Anybody who reports their neighbors to authorities for having too many people over or children for not masking at the playground, would have snitched on fugitive slaves to the authorities 200 years ago.

Anybody who complains to store employees about the one shopper who is unmasked - probably for medical reasons - would have complained about blacks for drinking out of "whites only" water faucets and would have helped deliver Japanese-Americans to internment camps during WWII.

Any employee who refuses to serve a maskless shopper would have refused to serve a black shopper during Jim Crow.

Any business owner who complies with lockdown orders, outdoor-only dining, and myriad of other Covid rules/regulations, would have segregated their restaurants with "whites only" signs.

If you're going along with Covid lockdowns, masks, distancing, while complaining against any acts of independence and defiance - which is 99% of you - you're no different than the people who went along with slavery, Japanese internment, and Jim Crow in the past.

And please, save the excuses, as "compelling" arguments were made for slavery (Africans incapable of agency, innately barbaric, savages), Japanese (spies, traitors), southern blacks under Jim Crow (anti-miscegenation, custom, separate but equal, former slaves can't compete).


 +   5 people like this
Posted by alicia puente, a resident of Los Altos,
on Mar 12, 2021 at 7:54 am

alicia puente is a registered user.

"How ironic and hypocritical that the people who most favor canceling former slave owners, racist, xenophobes - and those who supported them - are the very same people who most vocally defend the greatest human rights abuses in most of our lifetimes - the lockdowns, forced mask wearing, school closures, social distancing, and, coming soon, vaccine passports."

@ Alvin, a resident of Professorville

Thank you for putting things in their proper perspective as there are no 'cut and dried' sides to any argument or debate.

For example...

The internment of Japanese-Americans during World War 2 was promoted and endorsed by esteemed liberals such as FDR, and SCOTUS justices William O. Douglas and Felix Frankfurter.

The conservative 'originalist' justices (including the Chief Justice) voted against this measure.

It is ironic how the liberal 'human rights' advocates tend to pick and choose their issues.

And the same applies to the current public health mandates, closures and restrictions.

As you have keenly noted/implied, most people tend to be sheep and obsequiously play 'follow the leader'...oftentimes to those who are not worthy of leading a trail of ants.

And this can be applied both ways given the January 6th insurrection at the Capitol.

The coronavirus is just one of many plagues that have addicted mankind and the option to adhere to certain public health 'recommendations' including mandates should remain up to the individual(s).

If people want to risk their lives, so be it. Meanwhile, those who fear 'second hand' exposure should simply avoid them in public.

And the same goes for movies and books. If one is going to be potentially offended, don't watch the movie or read the book. It's simple as that.

Defamation in the United States is defined by intentional slander or libel.

And older books reflecting the perspectives of certain time periods do not fall under this category.

Live and let live.


 +   8 people like this
Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 12, 2021 at 8:38 am

Bystander is a registered user.

As someone who grew up reading books now deemed "racist" or similar, I have turned into an adult with empathy and able to think independently and deeply on many subjects. I am able to treat everyone I meet with respect, with compassion or sympathy if needed, and tolerate all types of people in my life, my neighborhood, my workplace, my social circle. I do not put people in boxes and I celebrate their different cultures with them when invited.

Isn't that really what matters? The last couple of posts have raised some good points. We are all very much products of what society and government actions make us do. Some of the things are to protect us such as during the pandemic and we have all been expected to obey them even if we do not agree with them or the science behind them.

But, as with views on things other than the pandemic, we must all be allowed to have our opinions and voice them. Books that we read as children may no longer be the ones we want our children to read, but isn't that the decision as parents we are entitled to make?

Society changes all the time. The Covid Generation are going to be very much a part of the future psyche of society. I think more energy should be put into returning our children's lives to them, than anything else. If they are our future (which I think they are), we need them to come out of isolation, fear and mask wearing. That should be top priority.


 +   18 people like this
Posted by james, a resident of Mountain View,
on Mar 12, 2021 at 11:58 am

james is a registered user.

Just because some people don't like Brussels Sprouts doesn't mean it should be eradicated from the produce shelves.

Just don't buy or eat them.

And the same goes for various consumer brands and their packaging depictions.

Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's are symbols of trust and quality, not racism.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Lamont D., a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 12, 2021 at 1:20 pm

Lamont D. is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


 +   14 people like this
Posted by Sam Dalton, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 13, 2021 at 7:28 am

Sam Dalton is a registered user.

"Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's are symbols of trust and quality, not racism."

The family of the modern-day Aunt Jemima rendition received royalties ($1M per year) for use of their relative's image.

Now that the brand name has been changed, those royalties will now be discontinued.

Ironic.


 +   16 people like this
Posted by R. Cavendish, a resident of another community,
on Mar 13, 2021 at 11:09 am

R. Cavendish is a registered user.

> "The family of the modern-day Aunt Jemima rendition received royalties ($1M per year) for use of their relative's image."

Wow...if I was fortunate enough to receive $1M a year for having my aunt's picture on a pancake box (regardless of the depiction), I would be disheartened having to relinquish it due to 'cancel culture'.


 +   15 people like this
Posted by Jim L., a resident of another community,
on Mar 13, 2021 at 4:22 pm

Jim L. is a registered user.

The liberals, progressives, and minorities are altering the cultural landscape of America with their feigned outrage and it is a malignancy.


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Squidsie, a resident of another community,
on Mar 13, 2021 at 9:23 pm

Squidsie is a registered user.

When I am required to identify my race or ethnicity on some form, I simply list "Earthling". That seems to flummox those trying so hard to divide us for their own political purposes.


 +   4 people like this
Posted by TripleLMember, a resident of Triple El,
on Mar 13, 2021 at 10:28 pm

TripleLMember is a registered user.

It is not the chop sticks, but the depiction of the man wearing (Manchu)conical hat and having a long pigtail that's very offensive. The pigtail was forced upon the Han Chinese when the Manchurian conquered China in the seventeenth century. It is a symbol of subjugation analogous to the chains on slaves. Seuss knew enough to remove the pigtail in later editions of the book.
I haven't read the book and won't comment on whether letting the book out of print is a huge cultural loss. Books go out of print all the time. As far as I know, the Dr. Seuss Enterprise was not "censored," but took the action voluntarily.



 +   5 people like this
Posted by Dad of 2, a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows,
on Mar 14, 2021 at 9:46 am

Dad of 2 is a registered user.

>> "Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's are symbols of trust and quality, not racism."
>> The family of the modern-day Aunt Jemima rendition received royalties ($1M per year) for use of their relative's image.
>> Now that the brand name has been changed, those royalties will now be discontinued.

This is false. This is why it is difficult to have a discussion with some people. They don't do simple research to determine whether or not a statement is true. They believe what they want to believe, whatever makes them feel better. And it makes them feel better to think that racism is no big deal, Blacks should just get over it, slaves probably were better off being slaves, etc., in other words, "It's not white people's fault! Stop blaming us! Stop trying to make me feel bad." That's the crux of the matter. No one wants to believe that they (or their ancestors) were racist or that they have been the beneficiaries or ill gotten gains. But you don't have to go back that far to find solid evidence that it is true. Just ask yourself if a Black family would have been allowed to buy the house that your parents bought (or if you are old enough, the one that you originally bought.) The idea that the Aunt Jemima image is not rooted in racism is ignorant. Quaker tried to change the image over the years to make it more palatable, and if it had sprung full form in its current rendition, perhaps it would be OK? But it didn't, it originated from the Black mammy stereotype and it's impossible to separate from its origins. It's shocking but not surprising that an educated adult in America could look at Dr. Seuss's images of Africans and not realize that this is racist imagery. But people are not going to persuaded to change by being called racists. Critical thinkIng is called for. I suggest to everyone that when you read a news or opinion piece, ask yourself whether you think the piece is trying to make you angry, and whether it succeeded in doing so. Are you being manipulated?


 +   2 people like this
Posted by Dad of 2, a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows,
on Mar 14, 2021 at 9:46 am

Dad of 2 is a registered user.

>> "Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's are symbols of trust and quality, not racism."
>> The family of the modern-day Aunt Jemima rendition received royalties ($1M per year) for use of their relative's image.
>> Now that the brand name has been changed, those royalties will now be discontinued.

This is false. This is why it is difficult to have a discussion with some people. They don't do simple research to determine whether or not a statement is true. They believe what they want to believe, whatever makes them feel better. And it makes them feel better to think that racism is no big deal, Blacks should just get over it, slaves probably were better off being slaves, etc., in other words, "It's not white people's fault! Stop blaming us! Stop trying to make me feel bad." That's the crux of the matter. No one wants to believe that they (or their ancestors) were racist or that they have been the beneficiaries or ill gotten gains. But you don't have to go back that far to find solid evidence that it is true. Just ask yourself if a Black family would have been allowed to buy the house that your parents bought (or if you are old enough, the one that you originally bought.) The idea that the Aunt Jemima image is not rooted in racism is ignorant. Quaker tried to change the image over the years to make it more palatable, and if it had sprung full form in its current rendition, perhaps it would be OK? But it didn't, it originated from the Black mammy stereotype and it's impossible to separate from its origins. It's shocking but not surprising that an educated adult in America could look at Dr. Seuss's images of Africans and not realize that this is racist imagery. But people are not going to persuaded to change by being called racists. Critical thinkIng is called for. I suggest to everyone that when you read a news or opinion piece, ask yourself whether you think the piece is trying to make you angry, and whether it succeeded in doing so. Are you being manipulated?


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Dad of 2, a resident of Menlo Park: The Willows,
on Mar 14, 2021 at 9:46 am

Dad of 2 is a registered user.

>> "Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben's are symbols of trust and quality, not racism."
>> The family of the modern-day Aunt Jemima rendition received royalties ($1M per year) for use of their relative's image.
>> Now that the brand name has been changed, those royalties will now be discontinued.

This is false. This is why it is difficult to have a discussion with some people. They don't do simple research to determine whether or not a statement is true. They believe what they want to believe, whatever makes them feel better. And it makes them feel better to think that racism is no big deal, Blacks should just get over it, slaves probably were better off being slaves, etc., in other words, "It's not white people's fault! Stop blaming us! Stop trying to make me feel bad." That's the crux of the matter. No one wants to believe that they (or their ancestors) were racist or that they have been the beneficiaries or ill gotten gains. But you don't have to go back that far to find solid evidence that it is true. Just ask yourself if a Black family would have been allowed to buy the house that your parents bought (or if you are old enough, the one that you originally bought.) The idea that the Aunt Jemima image is not rooted in racism is ignorant. Quaker tried to change the image over the years to make it more palatable, and if it had sprung full form in its current rendition, perhaps it would be OK? But it didn't, it originated from the Black mammy stereotype and it's impossible to separate from its origins. It's shocking but not surprising that an educated adult in America could look at Dr. Seuss's images of Africans and not realize that this is racist imagery. But people are not going to persuaded to change by being called racists. Critical thinkIng is called for. I suggest to everyone that when you read a news or opinion piece, ask yourself whether you think the piece is trying to make you angry, and whether it succeeded in doing so. Are you being manipulated?


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 14, 2021 at 11:30 am

Bystander is a registered user.

History has shown that there has been diabolical treatment of all sorts of peoples through the ages. Some has been by race, or religion, or place of birth, or place of domicile or wealth, or power. Some has been by fellow ethnicities, or similar religion (denominations), or geography within the same country, or invasion, or royalty, or money, or by having more advanced weaponry, or better prepared troops.

Slavery has been going on since mankind became somewhat civilized. It has usually been an indication of power. It has not always been white people and anyone who thinks that is showing a disservice to those who have been enslaved by others in other situations. The Barbary Pirates among others specifically targeted white people.

All slavery has been bad for mankind. It still tends to be bad for mankind. Don't think it is just something that happened in the past. It is still going on today and not only in foreign parts.

This is not an attempt to make anyone "feel better". It is to encourage everyone to look into what has happened and is still happening. How to stop it happening into the future should be a better aim as we learn from the past.


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Paul Darby, a resident of another community,
on Mar 14, 2021 at 11:46 am

Paul Darby is a registered user.

Perhaps the key is not to take anything personally and/or to consider the source.

Then we can all move on.


 +   2 people like this
Posted by Duveneck neighbor, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Mar 14, 2021 at 11:18 pm

Duveneck neighbor is a registered user.

@Petra Karenter:

You seem to believe the term 'systemic racism' is, somehow, not real; or that it alludes to a concept 'made up' by 'the media'.

If you believe that, then you haven't viewed the video of Palo Alto police officers during their illegal and abusive activities of February, 2018. That affair demonstrated Palo Alto (its police department, its city attorney, its city manager, and its police leadership) engaged in systematic abuse of its authority, and illegal misapplication of the law, all in our name. Those actions and behaviors constitute the very core of systemic racism. It is not some far-away concept, which applies only to, say, Minneapolis. It is right here at home.

Nor did you listen to the testimony of the many speakers at the 6 June 2020 rally.

Following that 12,000-person protest, Council and the Police Department have taken limited steps to improve the situation. But we still have a department whose membership and whose union have not taken responsibility for their behaviors. We haven't fully implemented the revised operational manual. We still have a Chief who believes firing at a moving vehicle can disable the driver (which simple physics shows is highly unlikely).

Meanwhile, dept leadership sought to *limit*, rather than expand, the role of the outside independent review; and, with city mgmt, sought to place even more behaviors beyond the public view. The officer in the Alvarez incident has retired; but, the senior officer involved in another, similar incident, remains on the force, undisciplined and unrepentant.

The choice we are presented with is NOT *either* police officer safety OR the safety of those whom they seek to interdict or arrest. We can have BOTH officer safety AND the safety of all.

Complaining about the Seuss family removing a few books from publication is a red herring. If Ms Diamond can't even get that right, then there is little hope of ending our intrinsic, systemic discrimination problems.


 +   4 people like this
Posted by Duveneck neighbor, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Mar 14, 2021 at 11:32 pm

Duveneck neighbor is a registered user.

@Alvin:

You wrote: "How ironic and hypocritical that the people who most favor canceling former slave owners, racist, xenophobes - and those who supported them - are the very same people who most vocally defend the greatest human rights abuses in most of our lifetimes - the lockdowns, forced mask wearing, school closures, social distancing, and, coming soon, vaccine passports."

I find it astonishing, in this day and age generally, and in this city more specifically, and for someone living in Professorville most specifically (and ironically)...

...that you cannot distinguish between a true abuse of human rights, and behavior which is at once simply yet manifestly selfish, and which threatens the health and safety of fellow citizens.

This pandemic is a once-in-a-hundred years public health and safety event. Yet between 1918 and today, we appear to have regressed, in our collective sense of responsibility not just *for* ourselves, but *to* each other.

The Declaration's soaring language regarding unalienable rights, and the pursuit of personal happiness, contained within itself the seeds of conflict, between multiple individuals pursuing selfish happiness. The Constitution acknowledged and resolved the conflict: *We* (not Me) is its first word, and the Preamble lays out our collective aspirations, and our responsibilities to one another.

Frankly, I don't care a whit if you don't wear a mask, or get vaccinated. The science says, as long as about 75% of us do, then the virus won't propagate in any devastating, resource-engulfing manner. We don't need everyone to comply with admonitions for intelligent and empathic behavior. It would be better for all if you did; but we can go on without you.

But spare us the label of 'human rights abuse'. Rubbish.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Marianne Phillips, a resident of University South,
on Mar 15, 2021 at 8:27 am

Marianne Phillips is a registered user.

"This pandemic is a once-in-a-hundred years public health and safety event. Yet between 1918 and today, we appear to have regressed, in our collective sense of responsibility..."

The same can be said of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake give or take a few years with the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.

Mother Nature wreaks havoc from time to time and it is unpredictable.

These events only give rise to insurance hucksters selling earthquake insurance and costly, oftentimes unnecessary retrofits.

It wouldn't surprise me if 'coronavirus coverage' is next offered on life insurance policies.

A neurotic fear of death and going overboard with unproven precautions is pointless.

And when it's time to go, just leave all of your material possessions and money at the door.


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Duveneck neighbor, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Mar 15, 2021 at 8:35 am

Duveneck neighbor is a registered user.

@Marianne Phillips:

Are you saying, then, that taking *any* precautions relative to SARS-CoV-2, or indeed to any virus, is pointless? That we should all just go about our business, no matter the consequences to human life and health, to planetary health, to any idealistic or altruistic or moral or ethical consideration whatsoever?


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Duveneck neighbor, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Mar 15, 2021 at 8:37 am

Duveneck neighbor is a registered user.

@Marianne Phillips:

Or, are you saying that mask-wearing, isolation/quarantine, and vaccination, are 'unproven precautions', and therefore pointless?


 +  Like this comment
Posted by R. Cavendish, a resident of another community,
on Mar 15, 2021 at 9:14 am

R. Cavendish is a registered user.

Concurring with Marianne on insurance...like lawyers, insurance companies make their money off the misfortunes of others.


 +   6 people like this
Posted by Duveneck neighbor, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Mar 15, 2021 at 1:15 pm

Duveneck neighbor is a registered user.

And just to paint the picture more starkly:

While state legislatures around the country are busy passing laws to cancel the voting rights of tens of millions of Americans....

...Ms Diamond mis-applies the pejorative term 'cancel culture' to six books, well over 50 years old, whose depictions have long-since been passed by by society.

The dichotomy is not false; the juxtaposition is not fake. Why not? Because we have witnessed, time and again over the last four years, the mislabelling by Trump-style Americans: black is labelled white, up is labelled down, false is labelled true, in is labelled out, and so forth. Those who attacked the Capitol are fighting for 'freedom'; those who stand up for Black Lives are variously anarchists, traitors, terrorists; and so on, and on.


 +   5 people like this
Posted by R. Cavendish, a resident of another community,
on Mar 16, 2021 at 8:55 am

R. Cavendish is a registered user.

Another bone of contention...

FOX News 'pundits' Tucker Carlson and Mike Hannity were railing not only over the Dr. Suess issue but also the fact that Hasbro has now gone 'non-binary' with Mr. Potato head, which will now be renamed 'Potatohead' in an effort not to further alienate the LGBTQ community.

Curious...don't conservative 'expert minds' have anything better to do with their collective brain cells?


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Eleanor Johnson, a resident of Professorville,
on Mar 16, 2021 at 9:31 am

Eleanor Johnson is a registered user.

~~"Curious...don't conservative 'expert minds' have anything better to do with their collective brain cells?"

• Conservative and/or liberal 'expert minds' is an oxymoron.

As for Mr. & Mrs. Potato Head, Frito-Lay will also have to change their advertising portrayal of the heterosexual potato couple.

They will now become a 'non-binary' potato couple and various religious and conservative groups will eventually advocate a consumer boycott of Lay's Potato Chips.

You saw what happened to Lay's years ago with the 'Frito Bandito'.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by R. Cavendish, a resident of another community,
on Mar 16, 2021 at 12:55 pm

R. Cavendish is a registered user.

And it's not just Dr. Suess or Mr. Potato Head coming under further scrutiny.

Warner Brothers has officially discontinued skunk cartoon character Pepe Le Pew because Pepe allegedly promotes a 'rape culture' based on his unwanted advances towards a female cat.

This reminds me of a blog Ms. Diamond wrote awhile back questioning the uproar over the song, 'Baby, It's Cold Outside'....where does this outrage end?


 +  Like this comment
Posted by duncan, a resident of another community,
on Mar 16, 2021 at 4:28 pm

duncan is a registered user.

In parochial school, a friend of mine had his Casper 'the friendly ghost' comic book taken away at lunchtime by a sister who reprimanded him and emphasized that the only true ghost was the Holy Ghost.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Terry James, a resident of another community,
on Mar 18, 2021 at 7:33 am

Terry James is a registered user.

"...an effort not to further alienate the LGBTQ community."

Much to my surprise and further education, I recently learned that some additional letters have been added to LGBTQ.

It is now LGBTQIA...the 'I' stands for intersex (hermaphrodites) and the 'A' includes those who are asexual.

What puzzles me is why purposely advertise one's peculiar physiology or whether one has an aversion or minimal interest in sex.

The LGBT made sense but adding even more subgroups borders on the ridiculous.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by R. Cavendish, a resident of another community,
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:27 am

R. Cavendish is a registered user.

quote:

"The LGBT made sense but adding even more subgroups borders on the ridiculous."

The Q as I recall stands for 'questioning'.

That said, couldn't upon further reflection and consideration, one simply designate themselves within the pre-existing LGBT groupings?

Or is Q a permanent state of mind and/or existence?


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Jay, a resident of another community,
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:53 am

Jay is a registered user.

@Terry James, @R Cavendiah. You two are like archaic "explorers" remarking at the "strange" and "exotic" nature of people you've encountered on your trevails. Please do shut up.

Oh how strange it is that people label themselves!

I don't understand why they can't just use existing nomenclature! They should just fit themselves to a label that makes me comfortable describing them!


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Jay, a resident of another community,
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:53 am

Jay is a registered user.

@Terry James, @R Cavendiah. You two are like archaic "explorers" remarking at the "strange" and "exotic" nature of people you've encountered on your trevails. Please do shut up.

Oh how strange it is that people label themselves!

I don't understand why they can't just use existing nomenclature! They should just fit themselves to a label that makes me comfortable describing them!


 +   4 people like this
Posted by Tracy Levine, a resident of Downtown North,
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:59 am

Tracy Levine is a registered user.

>>>Oh how strange it is that people label themselves.

Seems to me that people shouldn't be arbitrarily labeling others as well as THEMSELVES.

It's a two-way street and perhaps ALL people should not be drawing unnecessary attention to themselves.

Live and let live...and pay no heed to useless labels, period.


 +   4 people like this
Posted by Becky Lawrence, a resident of Community Center,
on Mar 18, 2021 at 9:37 am

Becky Lawrence is a registered user.

"The Q as I recall stands for 'questioning'."

From a semantics reference point, Q infers a certain element of doubt.

C as in confused or U as in unsure/undecided would be far more appropriate and/or accurate.

Thus LGBTC or LGBTU.

The I and A additions are seemingly to provide a more inclusive grouping.


 +   5 people like this
Posted by R. Cavendish, a resident of another community,
on Mar 18, 2021 at 10:27 am

R. Cavendish is a registered user.

quote:

Seems to me that people shouldn't be arbitrarily labeling others as well as THEMSELVES.

This makes sense as using letters to describe one's entire universe is self-limiting at best.

Unfortunately everything has gotten overly political these days and perhaps the use of letters is so that non-lettered individuals will have an improved comprehension of who certain others are.

Will the S people will be the next ones to further designate themselves?

All of this seems so unnecessary.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by James Jeffries, a resident of Crescent Park,
on Mar 19, 2021 at 10:13 am

James Jeffries is a registered user.

¶ "The LGBT made sense but adding even more subgroups borders on the ridiculous."

^ The QIA additions lend me to believe that other designations will be added in time.

Placing the vowels between the consanents would be catchier and easier to cite when/if the letters get longer.


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by ariel fleming, a resident of Downtown North,
on Mar 19, 2021 at 11:40 am

ariel fleming is a registered user.

The LGBTQ and now I+A communities don't need to advertise.

Just go about leading one's life on one's own terms and leave it at that.


Follow this blogger.
Sign up to be notified of new posts by this blogger.

Email:

SUBMIT

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.


Get the most important local news stories sent straight to your inbox daily.

Bold coyotes at Windy Hill
By Sherry Listgarten | 7 comments | 2,987 views

Al Fresco eating: Peninsula cities debate post-pandemic outdoor dining
By The Peninsula Foodist | 5 comments | 2,569 views

Stay and Play – and Work – in Carmel-by-the-Sea
By Chandrama Anderson | 2 comments | 1,856 views

Police departments using PR techniques to justify their actions
By Diana Diamond | 1 comment | 482 views

 

Vote now!

It's time once again to cast your vote for the best places to eat, drink, shop and spend time in Mountain View. Voting is open now through May 23. Watch for the results of our Best Of contest on Friday, July 23.

VOTE HERE